Meet the Unhuggables!

Today, all of the 3/4 students were lucky enough to Skype with the Museum of Natural Science in North Carolina, USA.

 

We spoke to Kaytee, who showed us at least 5 different animals and insects that some people may have an aversion to or have many misconceptions about.

First, we met the Ball Python (Python regius).

Ball Python

Ball Python

We learnt that the python can open it’s jaws to the size of it’s head – the jaws don’t actually come unhinged but are held on by really stretchy muscles. Pythons take a long time to digest their food.

Then, we met an animal that a lot of people are scared of – a tarantula!

Tarantulas are "hairy"!

Tarantulas are “hairy”!

Tarantulas look hairy but these are sort of spines on their body. Tarantulas are very fragile. Did you know that if a Tarantula’s leg breaks off, it can regenerate?!

Then, we met a “fancy” rat!

Fancy Rat

Fancy Rat

Rats are actually quite clean animals – they don’t carry any more diseases than a dog or a cat. Rats are also very smart! There is a type of rat in Africa that can be trained to assist in finding missing persons.

We also met a baby alligator!

Baby Alligator

Baby Alligator

Alligators and Crocodiles should never be kept as pets as they cannot be domesticated. Alligators are born with teeth and the mother alligator is very protective of her young.

Finally, we met a creature we didn’t even know existed – a hissing cockroach!

Hissing Cockroaches

Hissing Cockroaches

A hissing cockroach emits air from holes in the side of it’s exoskeleton, which makes the hissing noise. When lots of them are on the forest floor and making the noise, it sounds like a snake which scares away predators!

We are very thankful to Kaytee and Matt from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences for taking time out of their evening to speak with us and share such interesting facts about amazing creatures!

We are hoping to learn more about these creatures next term when we start our Inquiry into life cycles of living things.

What is one fact that you learnt from our Skype call with Kaytee?

What do you want to learn about next term?

Geography

**Guest Post by Abbey**

3/4 D has been learning Geography over the past 3 weeks and we have started to make continent flap books., which have all 7 continents in them.

I have also learnt about longitude and latitude as well as the earth’s degrees.

I have really enjoyed the Skype sessions with other Australian classes, and the Geography Skype with the Grade 7’s , through that I learnt that on Google Earth , you can actually go to Mars.

Thank You.

Who can name all 7 continents?

Forensics Incursion

** Guest Post by Lily.M**

On Friday, 3/4 D and several other 3/4 classes went to the gym for the Forensic Science Incursion. Everyone had a great time!

Phoebe, our guest, told a fascinating story about the crime scene, and showed us different tables filled with interesting things to help solve the the 2 mysteries:

Who attacked Joseph Connor?

Who stole valuables from the auction house?

The information on the many tables taught us about DNA, fingerprints, and even a tent encasing a small lamp glowing with ultraviolet light. Almost all of things on the tables were things forensic scientists use to investigate a crime scene. Phoebe even said the ink on the fingerprints table was identical to that used in the FBI!  After carefully putting together all the clues we had gathered, we solved the mystery!

We also used the information learned from the DNA activity to find a student (Abbey C from our class) who matched the description, and Phoebe handcuffed and questioned her. She admitted to all the crimes, but despite our wishes, she was freed.

Did you enjoy the incursion? Which activities did you like the most? 

IMAX & Melbourne Museum

On Monday, all 3/4 classes traveled on a bus to the Melbourne Museum. We went to the Museum and IMAX cinema because we are studying Our Earth. Our big question to answer is “How does the Earth work and what can we do to care for it?”

When we arrived, we split up into our Inquiry Workshops groups before we went on a small wander around the Museum. At the beginning of term, each 3/4 student was allowed to choose a workshop to complete to learn about whichever part of the Earth they were most interested in. The workshops we were allowed to choose from were; Mythology/Astrology, Natural Disasters, Evolution/Animal Habitats, Dinosaurs, Geology and The Big Bang/Space.

We then had booked sessions to attend so half of us went to the galleries and the other half of the group had snack outside. The exhibits we were booked in to visit were Dynamic Earth, 600 Million Years: Victoria Evolves, First Peoples & Dinosaur Walk.

Miss Fraser took the Dinosaurs group. In our free time to wander around, we went to the Mind, Marine Life, Bugs Alive & the Wild exhibits. We were booked in to the Dinosaur Walk. We saw many interesting fossils and dinosaur bones.

After the Museum, we went to IMAX cinema to watch the film ‘The Earth Wins’. The movie was a documentary showing what the natural forces of Earth are capable of. We saw images Hurricane Katrina and the bushfires of Black Saturday in Kinglake which was quite sad but made us more aware of the devastating impact that natural disasters can have.

We have enjoyed the opportunity to learn about what we’re interested in this term and hope to do more of it next term.

What was your favourite part of the excursion? What workshop were you taking part in this term? What was your favourite part of the excursion?

SOLE Presentations

A couple of weeks ago, Miss Fraser tried to trick us and told us that all of the continents in the world were formed by one man digging a lot of big holes and filling them with water. She said that even though the land was once connected, it is now separated  by water because of this man digging holes.

We knew Miss Fraser wasn’t right. But could we prove her wrong? How?

We had a couple of sessions to research and then share our learning with the class. We found out that;

  • Earth is a rock planet
  • There was something called a “continental drift”
  • There was once a large land mass called Pangea – also known as the “supercontinent”
  • As magma below the Earth’s crust moves and circulates, it causes the shift of tectonic plates. As the plates move, so too do the continents on top of the plates
  • Pangea began forming about 300 million years ago, was fully together by 270 million years ago and began to separate around 200 million years ago

IMG_2328

**Miss Fraser is extremely proud of our researching skills and finding information all by ourselves (with the help of our partners and other class members.)**

We can’t wait to do another SOLE activity!

 

What did you find out from your SOLE research? Do you think you could prove Miss Fraser wrong? What was the best part of learning SOLE style?

S.O.L.E

SOLE stands for Self Organised Learning Environments.

Miss Fraser learned about SOLE Investigations from her friend Miss T, who teaches 4B in Mildura.

When Miss Fraser told us what we would we doing, this is what was on the board:

SOLE Instructions

Our task was to prove Miss Fraser wrong. Miss Fraser told us that the continents of the Earth were created when one man decided to dig really big holes and fill them with water.

SOLE continents

In our groups, we had to work together to research and find lots of evidence to use against Miss Fraser to prove her wrong. We used Google Apps like Docs and Slides to gather our information so that we could be working on it at the same time as our partner.

There were many people who thought that after reading one fact on one website that they could prove Miss Fraser wrong! They were encouraged to double check their facts and keep gathering evidence.

We have found out some interesting ideas and Miss Fraser has heard us talk about Pangea the Super-Continent and tectonic plates. We will be sharing our learning next week so stay tuned to find out what we learned!

What is something interesting that you have found out about how continents were formed? Was learning SOLE style fun? Why?